Aid For Japan – 8th Anniversary Event Review

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This year saw the 8th Anniversary of the 2011 Japan Earthquake/Tsunami. It provided an opportunity to pause and reflect on the losses that the country had faced, but also the optimism of building for the future.

On 11th March 2011, a disaster unlike any seen in modern times swept across Japan, claiming almost 20,000 lives and creating over 300,000 refugees in the Tohoku region. Among these were 236 children who lost everything – their homes and their family all in one day.

This year, Aid For Japan staged an event at Islington Yoga School with the generous help of longtime supporters Fudokan Battodo. Here, an audience of people keen to lend support to the victims of the tragedy, learned a little bit about the impact that this devastating event had on people’s lives.

A series of short films were screened, one of which focussed on Maria, one of the Japanese orphans that Aid For Japan has supported over the years. Although things have been difficult for Maria, she is now 18 years old, strong and doing well for herself.

One of these video screenings was set in a school with a teacher recounting his own story about the tragic events of 2011. Yukio Saito is headmaster of Ishinomaki Nishi High School. Ishinomaki town was severely damaged by the tsunami in the disaster. Saito Sensei has written about the experiences of those at the school during and after the disaster.

As the school buildings were on higher ground, many local people took shelter there and the school gymnasium became a mortuary that eventually held more than 700 bodies. The title of his book Ikasarete Ikiru (lit. ‘Allowed to live so Live’) describes the mission of those who survived – both children and adults.

Artist and Battodo Fudokan student Dominika also kindly donated prints of her artwork to help raise funds at the event (her work can be seen on her Instagram page).

Food and refreshments were available for attendees and Aid For Japan also used the event as a fundraising drive. As a result, the generous donations from attendees raised over £600.

Attendees walked away from the event with a stronger impression of the impact that the events of 2011 had delivered. Even 8 years on, the effect of the earthquake/tsunami still has a profound impact on those that survived the devastation, particularly the orphans who had lost everything – the same orphans that Aid For Japan is doing its best to lend assistance to.


Aid For Japan thanks all those that helped make this event possible: Fudokan Battodo, artist Dominika, the staff at Islington Yoga School, Yukio Saito and Japan Centre.

Aid For Japan also extends its warmest thanks to all the volunteers and helpers who kindly donate their time to the charity. Special thanks to Angela Shaffer.

http://battodo-fudokan.co.uk
https://www.japancentre.com/en
https://www.facebook.com/dominikaklimczakart
https://www.instagram.com/dominikanomed/

Aid For Japan – 8th Anniversary

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On 11th March 2011, a disaster unlike any seen in modern times swept across Japan, claiming almost 20,000 lives and creating over 300,000 refugees in the Tohoku region. Among these were 236 children who lost everything – their homes and their family all in one day.

In the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent Tsunami hundreds of Japanese children were left with only their memories.

Today marks the eighth anniversary of the Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami – it’s a time to reflect, and a time to commemorate the lives lost.

Aid For Japan was founded by Akemi Solloway in 2011 to support the orphans of this tragedy. In the short-term, the charity lends help to these children by supporting them and their carers as they rebuild their lives.

Each year, Aid For Japan stages events and activities designed both to raise funds and to provide a wide range of activities for the orphans to help build their confidence.

Aid For Japan’s long-term aims are to help and care for these orphans through a series of initiatives and support programmes.

Your donations and fundraising efforts help to make a difference. The money raised helps to fund Aid For Japan’s support for the orphans.

Aid For Japan – 8th Anniversary Event

posted in: Events, Fundraising, News | 0

On 11th March 2011, a disaster unlike any seen in modern times swept across Japan, claiming almost 20,000 lives and creating over 300,000 refugees in the Tohoku region. Among these were 236 children who lost everything – their homes and their family all in one day.

This year marks the eighth anniversary of the Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami – it’s a time to reflect, and a time to commemorate the lives lost. We hope that you will join us for a special event of remembrance in aid of the orphans of the disaster.

Date: 10th March (Sunday) 17:00-18:00
Place: Islington Yoga School, 357 City Road, London EC1V 1LR (near Angel station).

There will be a presentation of a video interview with Yukio Saito. Saito Sensei is headmaster of Ishinomaki Nishi High School. Ishinomaki town was severely damaged by the tsunami in the disaster. Saito Sensei has written about the experiences of those at the school during and after the disaster.

As the school buildings were on higher ground, many local people took shelter there and the school gymnasium became a mortuary that eventually held more than 700 bodies. The title of his book Ikasarete Ikiru (lit. ‘Allowed to live so Live’) describes the mission of those who survived – both children and adults. Saito Sensei will be visiting London this summer.

Cost: £10 includes one drink (wine, beer, soft drink, tea, coffee) and a Dorayaki

After this event we will have dinner at a Thai restaurant nearby: Thai Square, Islington, 347 Upper Street, London N1 0PD.

Please let us know if you would like to join us. Contact: info@aidforjapan.co.uk

Aid For Japan recognised by Prime Minister

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Aid For Japan founder Akemi Solloway Tanaka has been recognised for her work with the charity by the Prime Minister as part of the Points Of Light campaign.

Points of Light are outstanding individual volunteers – people who are making a change in their community. Every week day the Prime Minister recognises an inspirational volunteer with the Daily Point of Light award.

In a personal letter to Akemi, Prime Minister Theresa May said:

“Through ‘Aid for Japan’ you are helping children who suffered the devastating loss of parents and loved ones in the Tohoku earthquake to rebuild their lives. Thanks to your tireless fundraising efforts, the charity’s residential programmes are ensuring that these young people can regain their confidence and reach their potential.”

First established by President George H. W. Bush in 1990, over 6,000 US Points of Light have been recognised in the USA. UK Points of Light was developed in partnership with the US programme and launched in the Cabinet Room at 10 Downing Street in April 2014.

Since then hundreds of people have been named Points of Light by the Prime Minister, highlighting an enormous array of innovative and inspirational volunteering across the length and breadth of Britain.


https://www.pointsoflight.gov.uk/aid-for-japan/

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